10/25/2015 – Deuteronomy 5:18 – “Commandment #7: Be Faithful!”

Click this link to get the audio version: http://ppl.ug/3cef-tAGBJc/

Mark Wheeler

Exodus 20:14; Deuteronomy 5:18; Matthew 5:21-22; Mark 12:28-31

“10 Rules for Faithful Living: #7 Be Faithful”

October 25, 2015

Lidgerwood Presbyterian Church

We come to worship today, O Lord, some of us filled with discontent, some with fear, some with anger, some with hurt feelings. But, dear Lord, we all came here today. Empty our hearts and minds of malice and bitterness right now. Help us instead, to seek Your perfect power and presence, Your righteousness and redemption, Your Law and Your love in front of all other possible priorities, through Your Son Jesus Christ. Amen. 

I read a story about a man who spent days looking for his new hat. Finally, he decided that he’d go to church on Sunday and sit at the back. During the service he would sneak out and grab a hat from the rack at the back door.

On Sunday, he went to church and sat at the back. The sermon was about the 10 commandments. He sat through the whole sermon and instead of sneaking out, he waited until the sermon was over and went to talk to the minister.

Pastor, I came here today to steal a hat to replace the one I lost. But after hearing your sermon on the 10 Commandments, I changed my mind.”

The minister said, “Bless you friend. Was it when I started to preach thou shall not steal, that changed your heart?

The man responded, “No, it was the one on adultery. When you started to preach on that, I remembered where I left my hat.”

 The only reason this is funny is because it stirs in us a nervous guilt. That’s my guess….

We have invested the last month-and-a-half looking at the Ten Commandments. In The Gospel according to Mark we read where Jesus said (Look at your Sermon Notes page…): (Mark 12) “29 ‘The most important Commandment is this: “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.”’” And we saw that the first four of the Big Ten are about that. Can you name those first four?

  1. No OTHER godsall those other things that we allow to take first place in our lives are out of order!
  2. Make no IMAGESany image of God we make, any statue, any idea, any philosophy, will fall short
  3. HOLY be Thy nameGod’s name assures us of His perfect presence and power, do not misuse that
  4. Take a Sabbath REST – the Hebrew people had lived under the iron fist of Pharaoh, God says that under His authority we are meant to find peace, rest, in His presence

These first four Commandments are all about that most important one! Love the Lord your God with everything you’ve got, always, never-ending, without failhave no other gods! Make no false images! Do not misuse God’s holy name! Rest in God’s presence!

But Jesusgoes a little deeper: In the very next sentence Jesus says, “31 The second is this (in Matthew He says, “the second is just like it:”): ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”

That’s what the next six Commandments are about. How do we love our neighbors?

  1. We Give HONOR until it’s deserved – starting with our parents
  2. We Respect LIFE – to the best of our ability
  3. And …

Today we look at Commandment No. Seven. The NIV writes it like this: “You shall not commit adultery.”

This is not, especially in a traditional American mostly Caucasian senior-citizen church, [not] a comfortable subject to talk about from the pulpit! But – it’s in the Bible – and it still applies to us. How do we love our neighbors as ourselves? Do not commit adultery!

And, let me add, because of the way Jesus talks about this commandment, and what Paul says in a few places, and what is in the Old Testament Torah-books, and elsewhere in Scripture, I think we can define “adultery as any kind of sexual ethic beyond what the Bible states as “giving honor” and “respecting life”.

Jesus said, in the Sermon on the Mount, [you have this in your Sermon Notes page if you would like to easily read along – I read a paraphrase this week, by a Bible scholar named John Sartelle, that I think states this so plainly and perfectly; so listen to this paraphrase as you follow along: “‘Jesus is talking, and He says, “By the way, when you attempt to redefine the Law and use it to throw away a wife or a husband at your convenience so you can marry someone more appealing to you – that is nothing but out-and-out adultery. Your effort to legalize it does not make it something moral.” This scholar goes on to say, “Jesus was not setting forth a full treatise on marriage and divorce. He was talking about adultery – that was His subject. The Pharisees were saying, ‘We would never commit adultery. We simply divorce our wives and then we are free to marry more desirable women.’ Jesus was saying ‘That is still adultery! You tried to make it look right through a formal divorce, but it still adultery.’ (Matthew 5:27-32) He even says that just “lusting” after a woman commits your heart to adultery.

Why? Because the two had become one! You can’t, willy-nilly, tear that apart! Not without damaging both halves!

Let’s take a few more steps back – in time and in Scripture: Eve stood before Adam, and he stood before her. God had made them for each other. As they observed each other, there must have been wonder. She saw that he was the same, and yet different. He saw that she was the same, and yet different. However, in their differences they fit each other. Their differences actually enhanced their relationship. They reveled in the Creator’s design for their bodily union. And in short time they would discover that there were other differences as wellemotional differences, personality differences, etc. Daily they would discover that the other contributed something to the marriage that the first could not. Each of these differences made them better as a couple.

And because of these differences, God’s design was that, the two would become one. That was God’s plan. “What God has joined together, let no one tear asunder.”

Now, let’s be honest. Adam and Eve had way fewer extramarital options or temptations than we have today! Whom would they have “cheatedwith? Right?

But let’s be just as honest as we look at what is right and what is wrong. The beauty of God’s plan is not made ugly just because we are given more responsibility to be faithful!

Is divorce ever permitted? Ever acceptable? Ever the best choice? Yes. It is not God’s hoped-for plan, but in this very passage, Jesus gives permission to make it right when there has been infidelity! The Command, therefore, is Be Faithful!

And infidelity comes in many forms, including “good, old-fashioned adultery”, but being unfaithful happens with abuse, with estrangement, with “lust”, with pornography, with lack of affection. With all the biblical pictures of “faithfulness”, we are not lacking understanding of unfaithfulness.

It is sometimes the wisest choice to leave an abusive spouse – the right choice for both the victim and the children! When lives are being ruined, by any understanding of infidelity, divorce might be the only right option.

But it should not be willy-nilly simple! God has revealed Himself as the Bridegroom, and Israel and the Church, the fulfilled people of Israel, as His Bride. And He stays with us even though we have strayed away from being faithful! Thanks be to God.

How should we then live? How do we make decisions about marriage, divorce, and remarriage? We must return to the truth and beauty of God’s original design. We must set before the world the wonder and majesty of that physical, emotional, spiritual union that our Creator gave to be an immutable and indescribable blessing to His creation.

Yes, we are still sinners. And God offers the grace of forgiveness to all of us. But He also holds us to the standard set forth in Scripture. And every time we do not give in to any temptation of infidelity to our spouse, we give glory to God, we honor our spouse, and we respect the life that our marriage represents.

For those in the room who are not married – you are not left out in this Command. Be Faithful, like Brelyn Bowman was.

Did you see the story this week of the bride who, at her wedding, gave to her father a certificate, signed by her physician, that she was still a virgin? This couple, and this family, was celebrating their pledge to be faithful to God’s purposes (no sex outside of marriage). And the uproar across this nation has been incredible!

Living with a Biblical standard of sexual ethics might be hard work. That is why God gave us this commandment:

  • To reveal to us how much we need a Savior
  • To reel in our selfish desires to mistreat each other
  • To remind us what God’s character is – and therefore, as people created in the image of God, who claim to be followers of Jesus, what our character ought to be as we grow more and more into His likeness

And God’s perfect grace and offer of complete forgiveness is waiting for all who acknowledge our need, confess our failure, and repent toward loving God better.

Love the Lord your God with everything you’ve got; and love your neighbor as yourselfgive honor until it’s deserved! Respect life! Be faithful!

We can do this by acknowledging that God is with us, and nothing is impossible for God!

We might argue and debate over whether these Commandments belong in our Court Houses or classrooms – but there should be no argument that they belong right here, in our hearts and lives and church. If our Church ever turns our backs on the authority of these Commandments, may God have mercy on our souls.

Let us worship the Lord our God, above and before all else, and let us love our neighbor as ourselves, today and forever. Amen.

Psalm 119:105 tells us: Thy Word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.” Amen.

Resources:

Bowman, Brelyn; ABC Good Morning America; 10/23/2015.

Table Talk: The Christian Sexual Ethic; “What God Has Joined Together”; John P. Sartelle; November 2015; Pp. 4-9.

The Law of Liberty; “Unfolding God’s Glorious Law”; Project Restore, Inc; Locust Dale, VA; 2006; Pp. 6.

10/18/2015 – Deuteronomy 5:17 – “10 Rules for Faithful Living: #6 Respect Life”

Click here for an audio version of this message: http://ppl.ug/GsSCEReFoZ0/

Mark Wheeler

Exodus 20:13; Deuteronomy 5:17; Matthew 5:21-22; Mark 12:28-31

“10 Rules for Faithful Living: #6 Respect Life”

October 18, 2015

Lidgerwood Presbyterian Church

We come to worship today, O Lord, some of us filled with discontent, some with fear, some with anger, some with hurt feelings. But, dear Lord, we all came here today. Empty our hearts and minds of malice and bitterness right now. Help us instead, to seek Your perfect power and presence, Your righteousness and redemption, Your Law and Your love in front of all other possible priorities, through Your Son Jesus Christ. Amen. 

A couple of hunters are out in the woods when one of them falls to the ground. He doesn’t seem to be breathing and his eyes are rolled back in his head. The other guy whips out his cell phone and calls 911. He gasps to the operator: “My friend is dead! What can I do?

The operator, in a calm soothing voice says: “Just take it easy. I can help. First, let’s make sure he’s dead.

There is a silence, then a shot is heard.

The guy’s voice comes back on the line. He says: “OK, now what?

 

I realize there is a risk in telling a joke about murder from the pulpit. If I was out of line, or if that offended you, I apologize. But I told it because it speaks of the ease in which our culture is entertained by death. The number of murders on Network TV every week is in the dozens! And those are just TV shows; it doesn’t count the video games or the movies or the news.

We have spent the last five Sundays looking at the Ten Commandments. In The Gospel according to Mark we read where Jesus said (Look at your Sermon Notes page…): (Mark 12) “29 ‘The most important Commandment is this: “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.”’” And we saw that the first four of the Big Ten are about that. Can you name those first four?

  1. No OTHER godsall those other things that we allow to take first place in our lives are out of order!
  2. Make no IMAGESany image of God we make, any statue, any idea, any philosophy, will fall short
  3. HOLY be Thy nameGod’s name assures us of His perfect presence and power, do not misuse that
  4. Take a Sabbath REST – the Hebrew people had lived under the iron fist of Pharaoh, God says that under His authority we are meant to find peace, rest, in His presence

These first four Commandments are all about that most important one! Love the Lord your God with everything you’ve got, always, never-ending, without failhave no other godsno desire for riches, no dreams of popularity, no over-extended hopes for glamour, no worries, no fearshave no other gods! Make no false images! Do not misuse God’s holy name! Rest in God’s presence!

But Jesusgoes a little bit further: In the very next sentence Jesus says, “31 The second is this (in Matthew He says, “the second is just like it:”): ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”

That’s what the next six Commandments are about. How do we love our neighbors?

Today we look at Commandment No. Six. The NIV writes it like this: “You shall not murder.”

Your Sermon Notes page asks, “What is the shortest verse in the Bible?” And many of us memorized this in Sunday School so we could earn a prize – John 11:35 (your Sermon Notes page says Matthew 20:16I do not know where that came from), John 11:35, “Jesus wept.”

But, are you ready, that’s not really true (mind blow!). In Greek, the language John was originally written in, that verse is THREE words, and a total of 16 letters. Exodus 20:13 and Deuteronomy 5:17 are just TWO words in Hebrew, and only 6 letters! “Lo Tierzach!” “No murdering!

Let’s talk about that for just a minute or two. The KJV, the most widely read English language book of all time, and the version many of us memorized these Ten Commandments in, says it like this, “Thou shalt not kill.

I have had military veterans, reeling from guilt about their service to this nation, and to our world, ask me whether they have sinned.

I have also had people of all ages, and both genders, chide me about stepping on a spider, or even pulling out a weed – because I have just killed that arachnid or that ficus. Is that what this means?

Is “killing” always wrong? What do you think?

When is “killing” OK? Ever? Under what circumstances?          [“Murder”, not “kill” – taking of innocent life – on purpose – with intent to kill]          [war – self-protection – clan-protection – societal protection – food – safety – “rule over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, and over every creature …”]

Remember the context of these Commandments. 400+ years of oppression and abuse from the Pharaoh of Egypt -> the murdering of innocent baby boys by throwing them into the Nile River -> Moses having killed an Egyptian who was beating a Hebrew slave (was that murder? Did he intend to kill him?) -> the Passover event resulting in the death of Egyptian boys by the hand of God’s Spirit.

Murder? Seriously? Was this Commandment really necessary?

Let me remind you of the three vital things these Ten Commandments are meant to do for those who recognize the gift God gives us of His presence, I am who I am, Emmanuel, I am with you to the end of the age:

  • To reveal to us how much we need a Savior – even more than how much the Hebrews needed a savior from their oppression under Pharaoh, we need a Savior from our oppression under depravity
  • To reel in our selfish desires to kill each other – to restrain whatever evil we are tempted toward
  • To remind us what God’s character is – and therefore, as people created in the image of God, who claim to be followers of Jesus, what our character ought to be as we grow more and more into His likeness

Necessary? I think so. Look at the news, watch an evening of TV, look at what the guy on the bus next us is playing on his I-Pad. Murder is everywhere!

But even more necessary than that. Jesus said, in the Sermon on the Mount, 21 You have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘You shall not murder, and anyone who murders will be subject to judgment.’ 22 But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment. Again, anyone who says to a brother or sister, ‘Raca,’ [an Aramaic term of contempt] is answerable to the court. And anyone who says, ‘You fool!’ [“moron”] will be in danger of the fire of hell. (Matthew 5)

The Apostle John wrote, “Whoever hates his brother is a murderer.” (I John 3:15) Are you guilty? Probably. I am.

Is “murder” a forgivable sin? Anybody who’s ever driven right here on Nevada Street better hope so, because we have all broken Jesus’ version of this Commandment (maybe today on our way to Church!).

And, yes it is, “for while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8).

Love the Lord your God with everything you’ve got; and love your neighbor as yourselfgive honor until it’s deserved! Respect life and the lives all because Christ died to save our life for all eternity.

We can do this by acknowledging that God is with us, and nothing is impossible for God!

We might argue and debate over whether or not these Commandments belong in our Court Houses or classrooms – but there should be no argument that they belong right here, in our hearts and lives and church. If our Church ever turns our backs on the authority of these Commandments, may God have mercy on our souls. Let us worship the Lord our God, above and before all else, and let us love our neighbor as ourselves, today and forever. Amen.

Psalm 119:88 tells us: In your unfailing love preserve my life, that I may obey the statutes of your mouth.” Amen.

Resources:

The Law of Liberty; “Unfolding God’s Glorious Law”; Project Restore, Inc; Locust Dale, VA; 2006; Pp. 6.

10/11/2015 – Deuteronomy 5:16 – “Give Honor”

click on this link for an audio version of this message: http://ppl.ug/YiPcVt-Byuo/ .

Mark Wheeler

Exodus 20:12; Deuteronomy 5:16; Matthew 22:34-40; Mark 12:28-31

“10 Rules for Faithful Living: #5 Giving Honor”

October 11, 2015

Lidgerwood Presbyterian Church

We come to worship today, O Lord, some of us filled with discontent, some with fear, some with anger, some with hurt feelings. But, dear Lord, we all came here today. Empty our hearts and minds of malice and bitterness right now. Help us instead, to seek Your perfect power and presence, Your righteousness and redemption, Your Law and Your love in front of all other possible priorities, through Your Son Jesus Christ. Amen. 

A Sunday School teacher was discussing the Ten Commandments with her five and six-year olds.

After explaining the commandment to ‘honor thy father and thy mother’ she asked, “Is there a commandment that teaches us how to treat our brothers and sisters?”

Without missing a beat, one boy (the oldest of a family of seven) answered, “Thou shalt not kill.”

 

We have spent the last four Sundays looking at the first four of the Big Ten Commandments. Can you name those first four?

  1. No OTHER godsall those other things that we allow to take first place in our lives are out of order!
  2. Make no IMAGESany image of God we make, any statue, any idea, any philosophy, will fall short
  3. HOLY be Thy nameGod’s name assures us of His perfect presence and power, do not misuse that
  4. Take a Sabbath REST – the Hebrew people had lived under the iron fist of Pharaoh, God says that under His authority we are meant to find peace, rest, in His presence

These Ten Commandments are meant to do three vital things for those who recognize the gift God gives us of His presence, I am who I am, Emmanuel, I am with you to the end of the age:

  • To reveal to us how much we need a Savior – even more than how much the Hebrews needed a savior from their oppression under Pharaoh, we need a Savior from our oppression under depravity
  • To reel in our selfish desires to kill each other – to restrain whatever evil we are tempted toward
  • To remind us what God’s character is – and therefore, as people created in the image of God, who claim to be followers of Jesus, what our character ought to be as we grow more and more into His likeness

When Jesus was asked, by people who perhaps hoped to trip Him up, which of the 10 Commandments was the greatest, most important one. Both Matthew and Mark record this story. What is Jesus’ answer? (Look at your Sermon Notes page…): (Mark 12) “29 ‘The most important one,’ answered Jesus, ‘is this: “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.”’Jesus is merely quoting from Deuteronomy 6 (our Call to Worship this morning). Love the Lord your God with everything you’ve got, always, never-ending, without failhave no other godsno desire for riches, no dreams of popularity, no over-extended hopes for glamour, no worries, no fearshave no other gods! Make no false images! Do not misuse God’s holy name! Rest in God’s presence!These first four Commandments are all about that most important one!

But Jesus’ answer to those who asked Him this question goes a little bit further: In the very next sentence Jesus says, “31 The second is this (in Matthew He says, “the second is just like it:”): ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”

That, Church, is His summation (and Leviticus’ summation) of the remaining six Commandments. How do we love our neighbors as ourselves?

Commandment number Five says, in Exodus 20, “Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be prolonged in the land which the Lord your God gives you.

Deuteronomy 5’s version is slightly longer: “Honor your father and your mother, as the Lord your God has commanded you, that your days may be prolonged and that it may go well with you on the land which the Lord your God gives you.

May God bless the reading, hearing, receiving of His Word which never fails.

Two quick and easy things to notice about this Commandment: first, it’s not about God (it’s about human relationships); second, it comes with a promise (that your days may be prolonged in the land the Lord your God gives you).

Why do you think this Commandment comes with a promise/positive consequence?

I think it’s related to how peace in our lives, harmony in our homes, respect in our relationships, results in an ability to establish deeper roots and more hopeful outcomesloving longevity.

What does the word “Honor” mean in this context?

Respect” is the usual synonym we choose, and it’s a good one. To hold in high esteem, to love and cherish. The Commandment says that this is what we are to pay our parents! Why does it specify our parents?

I think it’s because our Father and Mother are our first relationships. If we can start well with our first relations, perhaps we can translate that over to our siblings and our neighbors and our government officials and our pastors and our children and our peers.

We were probably all taught that honor and respect must be earned. I want to say how much I agree with that. If I want to be treated with decency and a degree of deference, then I must live with integrity striving to prove that my existence deserves some level of love. That is true as a husband, as a father, as a friend, as a pastor.

But this Commandment says nothing about the parents who are to receive this respect. It says simply that we are to give them honor! How can “honor” be a gift?

Here’s the real beauty of this Commandment. While I should not expect honor unless I earn it; but because God has already honored me with the gift of His nameHe gave me, and you, He gave us His name, to be used in powerful ways: to call on Him in prayer, to cry for Him when we are in need, to acknowledge His presence always, and to receive His Son and His Holy Spirit as daily Savior and constant Lord, to call upon the name of the Lord and be saved, while we were still sinners, completely undeserving – (because God has already honored us with the gift of his presence) therefore I am meant to offer this same honor to those around me who obviously don’t deserve it either!

Love the Lord your God with everything you’ve got; and love your neighbor as yourselfgive honor until it’s deserved! “But I can’t do that! My mom, husband, neighbor, boss, pastor – drives me crazy! How can I honor him?!

Only by acknowledging that God is with us, and nothing is impossible for God!

We might argue and debate over whether or not these Commandments belong in our Court Houses or classrooms – but there should be no argument that they belong right here, in our hearts and lives and church.

If our Church ever turns our backs on the authority of these Commandments, may God have mercy on our souls. Let us worship the Lord our God, above and before all else, and let us love our neighbor as ourselves, today and forever. Amen. Psalm 119:165 tells us: “Great peace have they who love Your Law: nothing shall offend them.” Amen.

Resources:

The Law of Liberty; “Unfolding God’s Glorious Law”; Project Restore, Inc; Locust Dale, VA; 2006; Pp. 6.

10/04/2015 – Deuteronomy 5:12-15 – “Take a Sabbatical”

For an audio version of this message, click on this link: http://ppl.ug/a-jwBBm1NH8/

Mark Wheeler

Exodus 20:8-11; Deuteronomy 5:12-15

“10 Rules for Faithful Living: Take a Sabbatical”

October 4, 2015

Lidgerwood Presbyterian Church

We come to worship today, O Lord, some of us filled with discontent, some with fear, some with anger, some with hurt feelings. But, dear Lord, we all came here today. Empty our hearts and minds of malice and bitterness right now. Help us instead, to seek Your perfect power and presence, Your righteousness and redemption, Your Law and Your love in front of all other possible priorities, through Your Son Jesus Christ. Amen. 

So, this man comes into the synagogue on a Sabbath Day to call the doctor about his sick child. “Do you have a ticket to get in?” asks the usher at the door.

“No I don’t. I just need to speak to Dr. Schwartz.”

“Sorry, I can’t let you in without a ticket.”

“But you don’t understand – my child is sick and I may need to take him to the hospital. This is a matter of life and death.”

The usher finally relents – “OK, I’ll let you in. But don’t let me catch you praying!”

In today’s passage from Deuteronomy 5 (and from Exodus 20) we hear a Commandment about remembering the Sabbath and keeping it holy. Remember how and why God gave us these Ten Commandments? ·

Israel in Egypt for 400 years·

Egyptian kings forgot how valuable Israelites had been to Egypt’s economy·

New Pharaoh, out of fear of the large number of these immigrant people, becomes a tyrannical power player and puts the Israelites in poverty·

God gives the Israelites Moses as a deliverer·

Moses meets God in a burning bush, and God tells him His name is YHWHI am who I am (whenever we read the word Lord in all caps, that means the Bible actually says YHWH [or Jehovah], but God’s name is too holy for the Jews to actually utter, so they say Adonai which means Lord

Moses rescues them from Egypt and they wander for 40 years in the Wilderness on their way to the Land God had Promised their forefathers

While in the Wilderness God gives these delivered Israelites a new way of living from what they had known under the power-broker Pharaoh – the Ten Commandments

Listen to the Word of the Lord from Deuteronomy 5:1-6, 12-15…. —-

Moses summoned all Israel and said:

Hear, Israel, the decrees and laws I declare in your hearing today. Learn them and be sure to follow them. The Lord our God made a covenant with us at Horeb. It was not with our ancestors that the Lord made this covenant, but with us, with all of us who are alive here today. The Lord spoke to you face to face out of the fire on the mountain. (At that time I stood between the Lord and you to declare to you the word of the Lord, because you were afraid of the fire and did not go up the mountain.) And he said:

“I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery. …

(1 – no other gods

2 – make no images

3 – Do not misuse God’s name ,,, 4)

12 “Observe the Sabbath day by keeping it holy, as the Lord your God has commanded you. 13 Six days you shall labor and do all your work, 14 but the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, neither you, nor your son or daughter, nor your male or female servant, nor your ox, your donkey or any of your animals, nor any foreigner residing in your towns, so that your male and female servants may rest, as you do. 15 Remember that you were slaves in Egypt and that the Lord your God brought you out of there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm. Therefore the Lord your God has commanded you to observe the Sabbath day. the Lord your God has commanded you to take a Sabbatical! – You were slaves in Egypt with no weekend and no paid vacation – Now – I say – take a weekly Sabbatical!

 

May God bless the reading, hearing, receiving, of His Word, which never fails! This Fall as we have been examining these Ten Commandments, we have noted three main reasons why God gave His people these Laws:

  1. to show us how badly we need a Savior (just like the Israelites needed a savior from Pharaoh),
  2. to keep us from killing each other (restrain evil-doing),

3.                to tell us what God’s character is (and therefore as people created in the image of God, and as followers of Jesus, what our character ought to beguide for living the Christian life as we grow to resemble our Lord Jesus Christ) – sanctification How does this Commandment do any of these things? We have been asking, what exactly does this Commandment mean? And how do we apply it in Spokane in 2015?!

We could look at Paul’s words in Romans 14 (:5-8) where he says: “One person considers one day more sacred than another; another considers every day alike. Each of them should be fully convinced in their own mind. Whoever regards one day as special does so to the Lord. Whoever eats meat does so to the Lord, for they give thanks to God; and whoever abstains does so to the Lord and gives thanks to God. For none of us lives for ourselves alone, and none of us dies for ourselves alone. If we live, we live for the Lord; and if we die, we die for the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord.

And I could create a 25 minute sermon on what that means for us. But today we are going to do this sermon-time a little differently.

On your Sermon Notes page you will find a Gospel story from Mark 2 (so, very early in Jesus’ ministry). Today we will invest some time “dwelling” in this Word from God.

I am asking for two volunteers, one female and one male, to read this passage out loud. The rest of us, I want us just to listen (and follow along) as it is read.

But, today, instead of us examining the Scripture and digging into what it says (with us intently looking down on God’s Word), I invite you to allow the Scripture to examine us, and dig into our lives (as if we are sitting under God’s Word, and He is looking into our lives).

After the readings we will sit in silence and reflect on what was read. Maybe thinking through the questions on the bottom of the page.

Then, when I signal you, turn to someone near you, in groups of two to four, and share your answers with each other. This is putting into practice the belief in the priesthood of all believers. After a few minutes of sharing, I will ask for a few of you to share what you heard from those in your group.

And then, we’ll close in prayer. Are you ready? Who would like to be one of our readers?

Mark 2 23 One Sabbath Jesus was going through the grainfields, and as his disciples walked along, they began to pick some heads of grain. 24 The Pharisees said to him, “Look, why are they doing what is unlawful on the Sabbath?”

25 He answered, “Have you never read what David did when he and his companions were hungry and in need? 26 In the days of Abiathar the high priest, he entered the house of God and ate the consecrated bread, which is lawful only for priests to eat. And he also gave some to his companions.”

27 Then he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. 28 So the Son of Man is Lord even of the Sabbath.”

Another time Jesus went into the synagogue, and a man with a shriveled hand was there. Some of them were looking for a reason to accuse Jesus, so they watched him closely to see if he would heal him on the Sabbath. Jesus said to the man with the shriveled hand, “Stand up in front of everyone.”

Then Jesus asked them, “Which is lawful on the Sabbath: to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill?” But they remained silent.

He looked around at them in anger and, deeply distressed at their stubborn hearts, said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was completely restored. Then the Pharisees went out and began to plot with the Herodians how they might kill Jesus.

 

Where did your imagination stop?

 

Are there words, phrases, ideas that grasp you?

 

What are you hearing in this text (where might the Holy Spirit be nudging you?)?

If the Church ever turns our backs on the authority of these Commandments, may God have mercy on our souls. Let us worship the Lord our God, above and before all else, today and forever.

Psalm 119:34 declares: “Give me understanding, and I will keep Your Law; yes, I will observe it with my whole heart.” Amen.

Resources:

The Law of Liberty; “Unfolding God’s Glorious Law”; Project Restore, Inc; Locust Dale, VA; 2006; P. 5.